aripinthefabricofreality:

inspiredmuslimah:

The man in the picture is Rachid Nekkaz, a French-Algerian businessman living in France.
He heard about the niqab ban in France. Then he announced that he will pay all fines for women who wear the niqab - not just in France but “in any country in the world that bans women from doing so”.
He opened a fund of € 1 million. Then he said, “My sister, go out free wherever you want and I will pay the fine for you”
Allahu Akbar, May Allah reward him.

Take note FEMA this is how you properly do activism to help women who cover themselves. 
Zoom Info
aripinthefabricofreality:

inspiredmuslimah:

The man in the picture is Rachid Nekkaz, a French-Algerian businessman living in France.
He heard about the niqab ban in France. Then he announced that he will pay all fines for women who wear the niqab - not just in France but “in any country in the world that bans women from doing so”.
He opened a fund of € 1 million. Then he said, “My sister, go out free wherever you want and I will pay the fine for you”
Allahu Akbar, May Allah reward him.

Take note FEMA this is how you properly do activism to help women who cover themselves. 
Zoom Info

aripinthefabricofreality:

inspiredmuslimah:

The man in the picture is Rachid Nekkaz, a French-Algerian businessman living in France.

He heard about the niqab ban in France. Then he announced that he will pay all fines for women who wear the niqab - not just in France but “in any country in the world that bans women from doing so”.

He opened a fund of € 1 million. Then he said, “My sister, go out free wherever you want and I will pay the fine for you”

Allahu Akbar, May Allah reward him.

Take note FEMA this is how you properly do activism to help women who cover themselves. 

acceber74:

blastortoise:

it’s so weird that people are shaming Beyonce for being sexual during her performance when literally in the speech in flawless says “We teach girls that they cannot be sexual beings in the way that boys are." Like how do you miss the point that bad

Because Beyonce’s black.  Black women being sexual is always viewed as deviant. 

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info
micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”
It’s fairly simple | Follow micdotcom
Zoom Info

micdotcom:

India replaces the Ice Bucket Challenge with the much more sustainable Rice Bucket Challenge 

After seeing the dramatic results from the Ice Bucket Challenge, Indian journalist Manju Latha Kalanidhi was compelled to start something similar, but with an Indian slant. “I felt like doing something more locally tangible. Rice is a staple here,” Kalanidhi told CNN. “We eat it every day, we can store it for months. Why not donate rice to someone who is hungry?”

It’s fairly simpleFollow micdotcom

cowbellguy:

Hand jobs and blow jobs are called jobs because they’re tedious and dicks are gross. Going down on a girl is called eating out because it’s a privilege.